Wednesday, 8 April 2015

Unscrewed


or, a poem for Easter 



The white doves are attacked by gulls,

   Their hearts pecked out, their entrails flow, 

The fish swim deep, are speared by terns,

   White lightning flashes from above,

The lambs go to the slaughterhouse, 

   Are chopped and served on china plates, 

The bread is stale, to eat it now 

   Requires water, maybe wine.

One light still works, but that is all, 

   Unscrewed the bulb out in the hall. 



13 comments:

  1. Oh Gwil, such a sad poem - not your usual cheery self today?

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  2. Don't worry Pat, today I'm as cheery as a daffodil.

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  3. Are daffodils cheery? i like the poem, have to read it more to be sure i understand.

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    Replies
    1. According to Wordsworth they are.

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  4. I like the header, the washing of the disciples feet. Let me hope the world turns around in the next of my twenty years and your poem is reversed.

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    Replies
    1. The world will continue turning and changing whether we like it or not. New problems and new challenges coming and going.

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  5. I photographed the fresco because it's unusual in that Jesus appears in it twice. He is in two places at the same time.

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    1. Such is the mystery of Jesus.

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    2. The first ever use of Photoshop, perhaps?

      Seriously, it's the sort of thing that, if a "modern" artist had done it, would have been dubbed "modern". It's fun spotting things that fall into this category. The world of the novel is full of them (e.g., Tristram Shandy and all the stuff about whales at the start of Moby Dick).

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    3. The figure is fixed not to a cross but directly to the bare wall in a bare and sparse but interesting Lutheran church in the picturesque lakeside town of Lindau, Germany. As you say if it was a contemporary carving, which it is not, it would have been dubbed 'modern'.

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  6. In today's paper a Dr. Aryl Shimron says he found Jesus and his mother Mary and his wife Mary and their son Judas and other family members in Talpiot. Mystery upon mystery.

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  7. Your poem (which I enjoyed - and found quite positive) begs the question - how many poets does it take to change a lightbulb?

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    Replies
    1. Two. One to hold the bulb and the other to turn him.

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